Monthly Archives: March 2014

Evidence On Best Ways to Teach Evidence-Based Medicine is Lacking

   In this systematic review of randomized controlled studies of EBM teaching, authors identified only 9 studies that met their inclusion criteria. That’s an improvement from a 2004 review that identified only 2 RCT’s on EBM teaching. Available evidence is … Continue reading

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What Do Your Students Really Think About Your Feedback? The Answer May Surprise You.

  Most of the research on feedback has focused on how educators should give feedback. In the recent years, there has been increasing attention to the role of the student in the feedback process. In this interesting qualitative study of … Continue reading

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What Should an Intern Know in July?

    Internal medicine program directors were surveyed regarding the skills that interns should have on arrival to their programs.  No clinical educator should be surprised that the number one skill was “Knowing when to seek assistance”, ranked as high priority … Continue reading

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Our Learners Watch Us Make Mistakes

     Martinez and colleagues surveyed residents and medical students for experiences, behaviors, and attitudes regarding medical errors and disclosure.  Medical errors had been observed by most learners and committed by many learners.  On the positive side, the vast majority … Continue reading

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Residents/Fellows and Hospitals Line up Incentives for Quality Improvement (QI)

   Educators at UCSF describe a robust QI program which had an impressive level of accomplishment of shared quality, satisfaction, and operational goals.  Examples are compliance with hand hygiene, decreasing the orders for “routine” laboratory tests, and completing a discharge … Continue reading

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Workplace Learning for Medical Students

Two studies examine how students learn during clinical rotations.  In a UK study (Steven et al), 22 students reflected in real time on audio diaries about their clinical interactions.  Students were dependent on physicians to facilitate their learning by giving … Continue reading

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