Monthly Archives: August 2012

Do Too Many Cooks Spoil The Broth? The Effect Of Observers On Doctor-Patient Interaction

Is your doctor listening? Maybe not so well, if there are other health professionals or medical students observing, according to this study of 5 plastic surgeons in 63 outpatient consultations. When other health professionals were present, visits were longer, with … Continue reading

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Without A Grid, Clerkship Grades Are Uninterpretable

No news here.  This compendium of clerkship grades from 119 medical schools shows that grades are all over the map.  The percentage of students earning the top grade in a clerkship ranges from 2% to 93%. Schools have grading systems … Continue reading

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Transitions Of Care: Faculty Feedback Improves Intern Sign-Out Of Hospitalized Patients

In this randomized controlled trial, faculty delivered twice-monthly feedback on interns’ written signout to an overnight coverage team.  Over two weeks, the intervention interns demonstrated moderate improvement as measured by the same checklist used to give feedback.  Other outcomes, such … Continue reading

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Objective Standardized Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) Fail To Identify Students With Below-Average Diagnostic Reasoning

In an interesting preliminary study, the authors find that many fourth-year students who pass the OSCE checklist, by performing adequate numbers of history and physical exam maneuvers and identifying the correct diagnosis, are unable to adequately describe their diagnostic reasoning.  … Continue reading

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Should We Teach Using Schemas? Evidence From A Randomised Trial

Students may use different diagnostic reasoning strategies to solve clinical problems. Schema-based reasoning is a process where key clinical features are used to include or exclude sets of diagnoses. In this randomized controlled study of schema-based instruction vs traditional instruction … Continue reading

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Free Curriculum On High-Value, Cost-Conscious Care

ABIM (AM Board of Internal Medicine), AAIM (Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine) and ACP (American College of Physicians) have created a free  curriculum to train internal medicine residents on providing high-value, cost conscious care. The curriculum consists of ten 1-hour … Continue reading

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