Monthly Archives: May 2014

Innovation in Education

 This month’s issue of Medical Education has several Really Good Stuff (RGS) articles that are worth reading, including the introduction, where intern deputy editors provide their advice for authors who are seeking to publish their medical innovation projects. Generalizability of … Continue reading

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Can Tracking Faculty Professional Behavior Reduce Student Mistreatment?

   In this paper by Trontell et al, student response to the AAMC Graduation Questionnaire on mistreatment at a US medical school leads to initiation of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) approach to measuring and tracking faculty professional behavior using … Continue reading

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Recipe for Useful Noon Conferences

  Two studies look at improving residents’ conferences. One study (Sawatsky) used focus groups to get residents’ thoughts on what makes a noon conference useful to them. The other study (Ha) compared a one-hour daily noon conference each weekday to … Continue reading

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Benefits of Collaboration and Hands-on Learning

   Educators in Ghent University, Belgium, looked at different modalities of teaching Occupational Medicine to fourth-year medical students. For the first year of the study, students received hard copies of case studies and had to hand in written assignments.  The … Continue reading

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Docere is Latin for “To Teach”

   A curriculum was developed at Tufts University School of Medicine for fourth-year students with the goal of teaching them to be competent educators.  Over the course of 12 weeks, the fourth-year students facilitated small group patient interview practice sessions … Continue reading

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More on Learner Mistreatment

 Lots of groups are addressing the issue of learner mistreatment.  Mavis et al discuss longitudinal data from the AAMC’s Graduation Questionnaire.  Over the years, the percentage of medical students reporting mistreatment has remained stubbornly high, with attendings, residents, nurses, and other … Continue reading

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Student-led Student Reports

Nelson et al describe implementing a near-peer led “student reports” for pre-clerkship students with the goal of facilitating transition into clinical clerkships and building clinical reasoning skills. While student reports and the use of near-peers in medical education are not … Continue reading

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