Monthly Archives: January 2015

Have Your Attending (Not The Trainee) Decide If Intensive Care Is Futile

   In this extensive single-center study, critical care attendings and fellows generated more than 10,000 assessments regarding the futility of care provided to their ICU patients.  Attendings were much less likely than fellows (7% vs. 17%) to deliver an assessment … Continue reading

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For Diagnostic Reasoning Accuracy, Experience Helps — Time Pressure & Interruptions Don’t Hurt

  Forty-six US and Canadian ER attending physicians and 152 multi-specialty Canadian residents sitting for Part II qualifying exams were given 20 general medical diagnostic cases.  Attendings scored more correct answers (71%) than residents (43%).  Test-takers were randomly exposed to different … Continue reading

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Does A Milestone-Based Evaluation Have Better Discriminatory Ability? Yes and No.

    Residency programs across the country have recently transitioned to a Milestone-based evaluation form in response to ACGME’s call to measure and report resident performance via education milestones. Prior to this change, many evaluation systems relied on the Dreyfus … Continue reading

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Just-in-Time Teaching With Peer Instruction Improves Resident Involvement During Conferences

  Several techniques for increasing learner engagement as compared to lecture have been described in the general education literature and are starting to replace lectures in didactic conferences for residents.  In a surgical residency program, faculty members were offered faculty development … Continue reading

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Medical Education Leaders Don’t Know Much About Medical Education Evidence

  In this qualitative study, investigators interviewed 15 undergraduate medical education leaders regarding their use of empirical evidence about medical education practices.  They found that “many did not actively seek research evidence to inform their educational practices.”  Three factors were reported … Continue reading

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Have Resident Duty Hour Regulations Improved Patient Outcomes? Maybe Not.

  In 2003, the ACGME implemented what was then received as a rather dramatic restriction on resident duty hours: weekly limit of 80 hours and consecutive work hour limit of 30 hours. In 2011, the ACGME further revised resident duty hour … Continue reading

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