Monthly Archives: September 2015

Out with the OSCE checklists?

  Adding to data that checklists may not be the best way to evaluate observed clinical encounters (“Throw Out The Checklists (To Determine OSCE Failure)!  A Global Competent/Not Competent Rating Is Better“),researchers looked at internal medicine interns’ evaluations of history and physical … Continue reading

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Can We Achieve The Ideal Internal Medicine Subinternship? 

   A joint task force of clerkship and residency program directors, Vu et al, developed (mostly) non-evidence-based guidelines for internal medicine subinternships, typically taken in the last year of medical school.  They recommend a rotation of at least 4 weeks … Continue reading

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Developing Life-Long, Self-Regulated Learners

  In order to stay current with the continuously changing medical literature doctors need to be life-long, self-regulated learners.  The authors of this study propose that medical schools, therefore, need to educate students in effective self-learning skills.  This paper examines if … Continue reading

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Step 1 Scores Should Not Be The Number 1 Barrier To A “Good” Residency or Fellowship

   No data here.  This is a strong plea to reverse the trend for post-medical school training programs to use the score on USMLE Step 1 (the first licensing examination of 4 in the US) as the major screening tool … Continue reading

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What About A Shorter Medical School?

   Several US medical schools are starting small pilot programs which aim to graduate students in 3 years rather than the standard 4 years. The authors cite observational data suggesting that 3 vs. 4 years of training had no effect on … Continue reading

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Teaching Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Can Be Hard To Do

  In this qualitative study, researchers interviewed 31 EBM instructors from multiple US and Canadian medical schools.  Several common challenges and potential solutions were identified.  Suboptimal role models were the most common challenge mentioned, as students interact with many faculty members … Continue reading

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Doctor Who? Patient Perceptions of Housestaff Involvement In Their Care

  Critical decision making skills necessary for autonomous practice are acquired through experiential learning in residency. Increasingly restrictive duty hours may threaten the number of these experiences and sense of patient ownership during residency. In this 12 year study, patients … Continue reading

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