Monthly Archives: February 2014

Students in Longitudinal Clerkships Develop Similar Skills to Students in Traditional Clerkships

  Two different studies looked at performance of learners trained in longitundinal clerkships, showing similar performance to learners who trained in traditional block clerkships.  These students tend to be self-selected.  The study by Myrhe et al was strengthened by matching longitudinal … Continue reading

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The Assessment of a Structured Online Formative Assessment Program: a Randomised Controlled Trial

  On-line formative activities are most useful when linked to an assessment.  Students’ activity and performance on clinical case exercises posted on-line were followed for two years.  The first year exercises were only recommended and contained pre- and post-tests, but … Continue reading

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Interprofessional Education in Outpatient Clinic Huddles

     A VA clinic launched a novel method of interprofessional education by requiring that medicine residents and nurse practitioner students attend daily clinic huddles with nursing, clerical, and medical staff.  Participation and quality were enforced by attending observation with … Continue reading

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Thinking About Decisions

  We know very little about how clinicians should, or do, make decisions.  Most theories support the existence of “fast” (intuitive) and “slow” (reflective) thinking in most cases.  In the study by Schmidt et al, internal medicine residents were more … Continue reading

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Lots of Barriers to Bedside Rounding

  Peer-identified “respected bedside teachers” were interviewed and identified multiple barriers to bedside rounding, including systems issues (e.g. geography, small rooms and large teams), time pressures, and low learner comfort with bedside rounding.  What might be more interesting is to … Continue reading

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Adopting a Blended Learning Approach to Teaching Evidence-Based Medicine: a Mixed Methods Study

  Two delivery methods for teaching Evidence Based medicine (EBM), a didactic approach and a blended-learning approach, were compared.  Students’ competencies in EBM, performance on criterion-based assessment tasks, as well as students perceptions on the teaching methods were all evaluated … Continue reading

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