Monthly Archives: October 2012

Longer (Vs. Shorter) Interactions With Attendings Are Preferable

Third year medical students in traditional block and year-long longitudinal clerkships were interviewed about successful and unsuccessful relationships with their teachers.  In both groups, longer interactions (days to weeks for block students, year-long for longitudinal students) were viewed as more … Continue reading

Posted in Undergraduate Medical Education | Tagged ,

Do Residents Like Evaluating Their Attendings?

The quick answer is no – they find it time-consuming and wonder whether it is worth it.  Residents felt it was most important that they provide feedback on attendings perceived as either much better or much worse than average. Some … Continue reading

Posted in Graduate Medical Education | Tagged ,

Residents Reflect On Their Errors

Forty-one medical residents analyzed diagnostic errors made on their patients. Common contributors were: holding onto a diagnosis made early in the course, coming easily to mind, or presented by other providers; over-reliance on authority figures or consultants; personal reactions to … Continue reading

Posted in Graduate Medical Education | Tagged ,

Can Residents Be Taught To Be Empathetic? Yes!

In a randomized trial of three 1-hour sessions for residents in multiple specialties, patients of residents randomized to training graded their doctors better at “showing care and compassion” than patients of those who were not.  Training focused on the neurobiology … Continue reading

Posted in Graduate Medical Education | Tagged ,