Monthly Archives: December 2012

M&Ms Go Systems-Based

In a comparison of department of medicine mortality and morbidity conferences at one institution from the 1999-2000 academic year to 2010-11, discussion of systems-based practice issues increased remarkably. For example, the chief resident made systems-based practice comments in 12% of … Continue reading

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Worrisome Changes In Medical School Financing

This interesting report on medical school financing compares sources of income in 1960 vs. 2008. During this time, the number of US medical students doubled, full-time faculty increased by more than 10 fold, and revenues increased by nearly 20 fold. … Continue reading

Posted in Undergraduate Medical Education | Tagged ,

Attendings Compare Learners To Each Other, Not To A Fixed Standard

In this elegant and provocative study, investigators asked attending physicians to score videos of residents with “borderline” clinical performance on a mini-CEX under two different circumstances, after seeing several good trainee videos, or after seeing several bad trainee videos. The … Continue reading

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Patients And Colleagues Tend To Like Doctors

Multi-source feedback is felt to be useful in the evaluation of practicing physicians. In this UK study, patients and colleagues tended to give evaluations that were very skewed toward positive. Also, very large numbers of surveys are required to generate … Continue reading

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Do Fewer Work Hours = Less Learning? Kinda.

In this retrospective study, investigators at a Canadian teaching hospitals examined medical-surgical ICU patient and procedure volumes from 2001 to 2010 and matched them to resident on-call schedules to identify maximum experiential learning opportunities. Over the 9 year period, they … Continue reading

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Faculty Can Make Their Lectures More Interactive

A 1-hour faculty development workshop for presenters at a pediatric residency conference series led to a large increase in active learning behaviors in subsequent conferences. The results might have been exaggerated given the lack of blinding in observers. — Laura … Continue reading

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Simulations To Ease Student-to-Resident Transition

Lots of new information on simulations, mostly for early residents. Both procedural (Cohen, Augustine) and non-procedural (Cohen, Miloslavsky) simulations increase learner confidence and/or competence for trained tasks. Even better, for faculty-poor settings, senior residents are perceived as excellent preceptors for … Continue reading

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