Monthly Archives: April 2014

E-Learning v. Classroom Lectures

    This small study compared e-learning with traditional lecture-type learning.  Two groups of 5th year dental students, with similar GPAs, were given the same course but with different teaching modalities.  One group was required to attend conventional lectures.  The experimental … Continue reading

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Loss of Idealism

  This study is a continuation of a prior study which surveyed first and second year medical students as to their motivation in selecting medicine as a career, factors influencing their specialty choice, and opinions about primary care.  For this part … Continue reading

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Student Mistreatment is Partly in the Eye of the Beholder

In this interesting focus group study, 41 senior medical students from McGill were asked to comment on suboptimal learning experiences and mistreatment.  Ninety percent reported any mistreatment during medical school; about half of the incidents had been officially reported by … Continue reading

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Does Emotional Intelligence Predict a Good Medical Student?

  The quick answer is:  No.  Researchers in Ottawa administered a widely-used emotional intelligence test to matriculating students and looked at various educational outcomes.  Not surprisingly, there was no correlation between emotional intelligence and multiple choice test scores.  However, there was … Continue reading

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The Fourth Year of Medical School Has Value After All

Graduating students from the University of Colorado, which has very few fourth-year requirements, were asked about the utility of the fourth year.  These students felt that the fourth year served several important goals.  For the subset of students who had … Continue reading

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Effectiveness of Blended Learning

  University of Buffalo educators compared teaching methods for their public health course.  One semester the teaching method was the traditional lecture format with some small group sessions.  The following year, the course was taught with a blended-learning approach, much like … Continue reading

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