Monthly Archives: October 2014

Professionalism Training

   Promoting professionalism in undergraduate medical education is an important goal of medical schools.  It has been noted that burnout and decreased empathy have been observed in third year students.  Drexel University College of Medicine instituted a Professional Formation Curriculum … Continue reading

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Stop Spinning, Start Planning

   Both readers and writers of medical education research should take note of Sullivan’s editorial in this month’s Journal of Graduate Medical Education wherein she outlines common “spin” techniques used in reporting education research results and how to avoid them. … Continue reading

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More Insight Into Diagnostic Mistakes On The Internal Medicine Service

   Diagnostic mistakes in internal medicine are common, and this study probably underestimates them.  Researchers, many of them residents, in Toronto tracked diagnoses made on medicine inpatients by the ER physician, the admitting resident, and the admitting attending.  The “real” … Continue reading

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How Should Classroom Faculty Achieve High Global Teacher Effectiveness Ratings? Beauty And Charisma Help

   In this lovely qualitative study, entering first-year medical students listened to 2-minute podcast clips of lectures previously given by well-rated (>4 on a 5-point Likert global scale) or poorly-rated (<3 on the same scale) faculty members.  During the podcast … Continue reading

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Should We, And Could We, Select Medical Students With A Higher Tolerance For Ambiguity?

   Poor tolerance of ambiguity in physicians has been associated with higher healthcare costs from excessive test-ordering and higher rates of burnout.  In this AAMC survey of all 2013 matriculating allopathic medical students (74% participation rate, n=13,867), students were asked … Continue reading

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Concept Mapping As Teaching Tool

  Having students diagram basic science themes is a good way for students to integrate complex topics.  First year medical students used concept maps as part of their problem-based learning exercises.  The authors investigated if/how collaborative drawings affects discussion and knowledge … Continue reading

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Should All Residency Programs Adopt The Block Ambulatory Schedule For Resident Continuity Clinic Or Stick With The Vanishing Traditional Weekly Schedule?

  This study involved 11 internal medicine programs participating in the ACGME Educational Innovations Project Ambulatory Collaborative, representing both university and community-based programs utilizing a traditional weekly model, block model with separate ambulatory rotations, or a combination of both. Patient satisfaction … Continue reading

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